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Naval leadership in the age of sail (1750-1840) - the Royal Navy Museum, Portsmouth

Date: 
Vendredi, 2 Décembre, 2011 - 09:15 à Samedi, 3 Décembre, 2011 - 14:45

2 and 3 December 2011  At the Royal Navy Museum, Portsmouth

Historic building ot Royal Navy Museum at Portsmouth

Sponsors

Society for Nautical Research, United Kingdom

The National Museum of the Royal Navy, United Kingdom

1805 Club, United Kingdom

The Gunroom, HMS Surprise

Fédération de recherche "Histoire et Archéologie Maritimes" (Université Paris IV - Sorbonne et Musée national de la Marine), France

Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Spain (CSIC)

Interactional Directors

Britain Captain Peter Hore

France Dr Olivier Chaline

Spain Dr Agustín Guimerá

USA tbc

 

Organising Committee

Dr Agustín Guimerá

Captain Peter Hore

Justin Reay

Peter Warwick

Dr Olivier Chaline

 

The directors and organisers propose an interdisciplinary, international series of conferences to enhance the understanding of the concept of leadership. The conference in Portsmouth will be the first of a series of [three] [four] international conferences in preparation for the publication of a comparative study of leadership.

Studies of leadership tend to be individual and national, and to concentrate concentrate either on the personalities themselves or the period in which they lived or the cult of heroes: often they emphasise the leader’s influence, effectiveness and achievements to the prejudice of a study of his intrinsic qualities of legateship. However a leader must have values and visions, which can be shared with and help to inspire others.

While leadership is necessary in all ages and at all levels of human activity, whether in politics, business, science, arts, etc., it is generally acknowledged that the acquisition of the required standards of leadership is a challenge in all societies.

However, studies of leaders tend to be overly influenced by contemporary culture and politics and an objective and comparative study needs to be set in a period when the leader’s results are well-known and personalities and traits can be compared objectively.

The international directors and national organisers therefore propose to investigate naval leadership in 1750-1840, during the transition from the Old Regime to the Liberal State in Europe, and human values in the years between the ages of Enlightenment and of Liberalism, and the change from gentlemen’s war to wars of annihilation in modern time.

From the mid-18th century, a wave of reforms took place, led by European monarchies seeking imperial expansion, status and security, and the evolution of the Atlantic Empires in an international struggle saw the decline of the Spanish Navy, the affect of revolution upon the French Navy, and the rise to hegemony of the British Navy.

The aim of the conference series is to compare and draw lessons from a study of distinguished leaders in naval politics, administration, and the command of fleets in the period 1750 to 1840.

 

Draft programme (three sessions)

 

Friday, 2 December 2011

0915

Registration

 

First Session. Naval Leadership before the Revolution: chairman

0945

Michael Duffy (University of Exeter)

 

“Types of naval Leadership”

 

1030

Simon Surreaux (Université Paris-Sorbonne):

 

“The Reputation of French Admirals under Louis XV (1715-1774)”

 

1115

Coffee

 

1145

Olivier Chaline (Université Paris-Sorbonne):

 

 

“The style of naval command during the American War of Independence: the Admiral D’Orvilliers”

1230

Discussion

 

1300

Lunch

 

Second Session: Naval Leadership in the Revolution and Empire: chairman

1400

Richard Harding (University of Westminster):

 

“British Admirals before the French Revolution”

 

 

1445

Tea

 

1500

Agustín Guimerá (CSIC, Madrid):

 

“Admirals in Confrontation: José de Mazarredo and John Jervis (1797-1799)”

 

 

 

 

1545

 

 

 

Rémi Monaque (Toulon):

 

 

 

 

“Admiral Suffren, forerunner of French admirals of the Revolution and Empire”.

 

1630

Discussion

 

 

Saturday, 3 December 2011

Third Session: Naval Leadership in Post-Napoleonic Europe: chairman

0945

Agustín Rodríguez (Madrid):

 

 

“Admiral Antonio Barceló and his outstanding career in Spanish Navy”

1030

Carlos Alfaro

(Kings’ College, London):

 

“A Conservative Admiral: Luis Salazar”

 

1115

Coffee

 

1145

Andrew Lambert

(King’s College, London):

Decisive effect: Charles Napier and the second battle of Cape St Vincent: July 5th 1833.'

 

1230

Discussion

 

1300

Lunch

 

 

 

 

Closing Session

1400

Peter Warwick

The Colin White Memorial Lecture

1445

Tea